China
Home > Taxon Links > Taxon Link

Taxon Link

I. AmphibiaWeb Taxonomy (Version 2.0)

AmphibiaWeb introduces its new taxonomy for families (Version 2.0, March 1, 2012). Amphibian taxonomy was relatively stable for 

decades, as summarized by Frost (1985) and Duellman and Trueb (1986). The advent of direct DNA sequencing methods in the early 

1990's enabled tests of previous hypotheses of phylogenetic relationships. In turn, new understandings of phylogeny led to suggestions for 

taxonomic revision. The first larg scale taxonomic treatment for all of living amphibians (Frost et al. 2006) proposed radical changes and

 additional publications have made further taxonomic revisions. The taxonomy initially used by AmphibiaWeb (February, 2000)  was 

subsequently modified, but cautiously and with much discussion; we have favored stability over new arrangements that might have proven

temporary. The AmphibiaWeb team has decided that there is sufficient general agreement within the community of amphibian 

phylogeneticists and taxonomists to warrant the adoption of an revised taxonomy. The most salient difference is an increase in the number

of families recognized. The specific rational for these changes is explained below. Taxonomy is a living, vibrant area of science,  and we

anticipate that ongoing research will require future changes. AmphibiaWeb will continue to make changes thoughtfully in order to best 

serve our wide and diverse community of users.


II. Reptiles Taxonomy (http://www.reptile-database.org./)

Traditionally reptiles are lizards, snakes, turtles, and crocodiles as well as the less obvious groups of tuataras and amphisbaenians. These 

groups are also covered by this database. But strictly speaking, reptiles are not that easy to define. Phylogenetically reptiles are not an

 isolated evolutionary lineage like birds. In fact, crocodiles are more closely related to birds than to lizards, so the birds should be part of 

the reptile class as well. Or the crocodiles should be considered as birds! For a more detailed discussion check out the Tree of Life page on

 amniotes, the CNAAR page on vertebrate taxonomy, or the Wikipedia page on reptiles. By the way , this database and Wikipedia are 

quite heavily cross-referenced.

Reptile database provides a catalogue of all living reptile species and their classification. The database covers all living snakes, lizards,

turtles, amphisbaenians, tuataras, and crocodiles. Currently there are about 9,500 species including another 2,800 subspecies (statistics). 

The database focuses on taxonomic data, i.e. names andsynonyms, distribution and type data and literature references. There is little other

information in the database, such as ecological or behavioural information. Thedatabase has no commercial interest and therefore depends

on contributions from volunteers. It is currently supported by the Systematics working group of the German Herpetological Society

(DGHT) and a small grant from the European Union through the Catalogue of Life project.


Species Numbers by Higher Taxa:

 

Feb 2008

Jan 2011

Feb 2012

Feb 2013

Feb 2014

Amphisbaenia (amphisbaenians)

168

181

181

184

184

Sauria (lizards)

5,079

5,461

5,634

5,796

5,914

Serpentes (snakes)

3,149

3,315

3,378

3,432

3,458

Testudines (turtles)

313

317

327

328

327

Crocodylia (crocodiles)

23

24

25

25

25

Rhynchocephalia (tuataras)

2

2

2

1

1

Reptile species total

8,734

9,300

9,547

9,766

9,909